Justice and Self-Interest

Book Name : Justice and Self-Interest_x000D_
Two Fundamental Motives

By by Melvin J. Lerner, Susan Clayton

Sub Title : Two Fundamental Motives

Written by : by Melvin J. Lerner, Susan Clayton

Subject Category : Psychology & Psychiatry

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about this book

This volume argues that the commitment to justice is a fundamental motive and that, although it is typically portrayed as serving self-interest, it sometimes takes priority over self-interest. To make this case, the authors discuss the way justice emerges as a personal contract in children's development; review a wide range of research studying the influences of the justice motive on evaluative, emotional and behavioral responses; and detail common experiences that illustrate the impact of the justice motive. Through an extensive critique of the research on which some alternative models of justice are based, the authors present a model that describes the ways in which motives of justice and self-interest are integrated in people's lives. They close with a discussion of some positive and negative consequences of the commitment to justice. Cambridge University Press; March 2011 ISBN 9781139065689 Read online, or download in secure PDF or secure EPUB format Title: Justice and Self-Interest Author: Melvin J. Lerner; Susan Clayton Imprint: Cambridge University Press Subject categories Psychology & Psychiatry > Psychotherapy > Group Law > Jurisprudence Philosophy > Political Social Science > Social Issues Psychology & Psychiatry > Social Psychology Social Science > Sociology Business > Economics > Theory ISBNs 1139065688 9781107002333 9781139065689 9781139063654 In The Press “Given the broad acceptance of capitalist philosophy in most of the developed and developing world, one could expect that self-interest motives would be used to explain all sorts of human interactions with others. Further, it could be expected that such explanations would be readily accepted. Are there no situations where humans act to provide or restore justice to others without benefit to themselves? Lerner and Clayton’s work emphatically says 'yes, there certainly are many such situations.’ The authors apply careful scientific analyses to studies purporting to support the self-interest explanation and dismantle them with surgical precision. They show that people's actions can stem from justice-seeking motives and not solely from strict self-interest.” – Selwyn Becker, Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Booth School of Business

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Related subjects

Psychology & Psychiatry - Psychotherapy - Group Law - Jurisprudence Philosophy - Political Social Science - Social Issues Psychology & Psychiatry - Social Psychology Social Science - Sociology Business - Economics - Theory

ISBN

1139065688 - 9781107002333 - 9781139065689 - 9781139063654

In The Press:

“Given the broad acceptance of capitalist philosophy in most of the developed and developing world, one could expect that self-interest motives would be used to explain all sorts of human interactions with others. Further, it could be expected that such explanations would be readily accepted. Are there no situations where humans act to provide or restore justice to others without benefit to themselves? Lerner and Clayton’s work emphatically says 'yes, there certainly are many such situations.’ The authors apply careful scientific analyses to studies purporting to support the self-interest explanation and dismantle them with surgical precision. They show that people's actions can stem from justice-seeking motives and not solely from strict self-interest.” – Selwyn Becker, Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Booth School of Business

Imprint

Cambridge University Press